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Lapo Bogani

Dr Lapo Bogani
Royal Society University Research Fellow and ERC Group Leader

Department of Materials
University of Oxford
16 Parks Road
Oxford OX1 3PH
UK

Tel: +44 1865 283341 (Room 195.40.03)
Tel: +44 1865 273777 (reception)
Fax: +44 1865 273789 (general fax)

Nanoscale Magnetism and Electronics Group (OxNanoSpin)

Summary of Interests

The magnetic and electronic properties of materials at the nanoscale. We pay particular attention to molecular systems, and how they can lead to multifunctional quantum materials and to nanoscale electronic devices. My group is:

  1. Investigating the interplay betweeen spins and flowing electrons in molecular systems
  2. Synthetizing magnetic materials with novel quantum properties
  3. Developing ultra-sensitive instrumentation for the investigation of single molecules

Current Research Projects

Quantum Effects in Electronic Nanodevices
Professor G.A.D Briggs, Dr L. Bogani, Dr J. Mol, Professor H. Anderson, Professor C. Lambert
Electronic devices, when shrunk to the molecular scale, display prominent quantum effects. Within the QuEEN programme we shall develop the scientific understanding and technological know-how needed to exploit these quantum effects for reduced-energy computing, molecular recognition, universal memory and thermoelectric recovery of energy. Our research will concentrate on the underpinning science of stable and reproducible devices, consisting of single molecules connected to graphene electrodes, with the potential for scalable production. We aim to harness quantum interference in these devices by pursuing five complementary research challenges: 1. How can quantum interference in a molecule be controlled by an electrostatic gate? 2. Can spintronic effects provide superior molecular devices? 3. Can quantum interference be used to achieve high thermoelectric effects? 4. What are the performance limits for a single-molecule transistor? 5. Can we make single molecule devices that work in ambient conditions? The QuEEN programme combines chemical synthesis, nanofabrication, measurement, and theory, and integrates these different areas of expertise. QuEEN has a distinguished international Board and a range of industrial partners from local enterprises to established global firms.

Optical Quantum Control of Molecular States
Dr. L. Bogani, Dr. J. le Roy, N. Dotti, M. Slota
While electronic devices are shrinking down to the size of single molecules, we still know almost nothing on how a magnetic molecule is affected by electrons flowing through it. We investigate these uncharted waters by developing innovative, ultra-clean methods that will provide information inaccessible to established procedures. This allows an unprecedented study of the interplay of electronic and spin degrees of freedom in magnetic molecules and of its possible use for quantum logic.  This is a strongly multidisciplinary project, and makes use of an innovative mix of chemical and physical methods to overcome present experimental limitations, both in terms of time resolution and cleanliness. Via chemical methids, we create ultra-clean system that can be studied in bulk, with a perfectly defined geometry of the magnetic and electronic elements. We combine optical and electron paramagnetic resonance techniques with ns time resolution, so as to observe the effect of electron flow on the spins in real time and measure the spin quantum coherence.  This project will answer two fundamental questions: How do molecular spins interact with flowing electrons? How can we use electronic excitations to perform quantum logic operations between multiple electron spins? The results will open a totally new area of experimental and theoretical investigation. Moreover they will redefine the limits and possibilities of molecular spintronics and allow quantum logic operations among multiple electron spins. This project is funded by the European Research Council with support from the Royal Society.

Electronics for Nanodevices
Dr. L. Bogani, Dr. E. Laird, Dr. N. Lokuciewski
Nanoscale electronic devices are currently paving the way for the future of commercial electronics, for scalable quantum computing, and for fundamental investigations in condensed-matter physics. Examples of such devices are single-molecule transistors, quantum dots, and superconducting junctions. Nearly all major universities and semiconductor technology companies (IBM, Intel, Samsung, Philips, etc...) have research programmes in this field.  Perhaps surprisingly, there is basically no existing commercial supplier of electronics for research on these devices. In the course of this project we are optimizing the design of the electronics, so as to bring the systems from a concept and very initial prototyping stage to a full optimized solution. This project is financed via an EPSRC impact acceleration fund.

Optical Control of Interacting Magnetic Systems
Dr. L. Bogani
To control system evolution it would be desirable to alter directly the interactions, at a precise instant and with a controlled effect. At present, extremely few methods allow this, and new concepts are needed. We are developing new ways to control spin interactions, checking the effects on the classical and quantum properties. This project covers the synthesis of materials tailored for the task, the development of innovative techniques for the experimental characterization, and theoretical modeling of the results. The project is testing four new concepts, and will contemporarily answer fundamental scientific questions: can we control molecular spin interactions using excited states and electron transfers? Can we use photons and electrons to perform quantum logic operations between spins? How can we control systems with long-range correlations? The results will open a new area of experimental and theoretical investigation, redefining the limits and possibilities of molecular quantum devices, and allowing light-induced quantum logic operations among multiple electron spins.This project is funded by the Royal Society.

Magnetic Hybrids based on Molecules and Nanocarbon materials for molecular Spintronics
Dr. L. Bogani, Dr. J. le Roy, N. Dotti
The fields of nanomagnetism and nanoelectronics are currently merging into a novel area, known as molecular spintronics[1]. In this new field, the electron flow through the devices is controlled by the magnetic properties of the molecules, instead of relying on materials with long-range magnetic order, as in standard spintronics. This opens completely new perspectives, and is leading to spintronic devices that display marked quantum features and allow electrical reading of single-spins. Moreover, the molecular spintronics approach allows expanding the range of materials that can be used tofabricate spintronic devices. In this project we create and characterize hybridmolecular spintronic devices made up by carbon-based nanomaterials and transition-metal elements. The project covers the synthesis of materials tailored for the task, the fabrication of the nanoelectronic devices, the development of experimental methods for the characterization, and theoretical modeling of the results. The project aims are both scientific and technological: it will greatly improve our understanding of molecular spin effects in electronic nanostructures, and will allow implementing efficient ways to harness and control the spin degree of freedom in electronic nanodevices. The project is funded via a Royal Society research grant.

5 public active projects

Research Publications

2016

María Dörfel, Michal Kern, Heiko Bamberger, Petr Neugebauer, Katharina Bader, Raphael Marx, Andrea Cornia, Tamoghna Mitra, Achim Müller, Martin Dressel, Lapo Bogani, Joris van Slageren. Torque-Detected Electron Spin Resonance as a Tool to Investigate Magnetic Anisotropy in Molecular Nanomagnets. Magnetochemistry, 2, 25 (2016).

 

Nicola Dotti, Eric Heintze, Michael Slota, Ralph Hübner, Fei Wang, Jürgen Nuss, Martin Dressel, Lapo Bogani. Conduction mechanism of nitronyl-nitroxide molecular magnetic compounds. Physical Review B, 93, 165201 (2016).

Christian Cervetti, Angelo Rettori, Maria Gloria Pini, Andrea Cornia, Ana Repollés, Fernando Luis, Martin Dressel, Stephan Rauschenbach, Klaus Kern, Marko Burghard, Lapo Bogani. The classical and quantum dynamics of molecular spins on graphene. Nature Materials, 15, 164-168 (2016). -Journal cover page-

2015

Dominik Schmid-Lorch, Thomas Häberle, Friedemann Reinhard, Andrea Zappe, Michael Slota, Lapo Bogani, Amit Finkler, Jörg Wrachtrup. Relaxometry and Dephasing Imaging of Superparamagnetic Magnetite Nanoparticles Using a Single Qubit. Nano Letters, 15, 4942-4947 (2015).

Shang-Da Jiang, Dimitrios Maganas, Nikolaos Levesanos, Eleftherios Ferentinos, Sabrina Haas, Komalavalli Thirunavukkuarasu, Jurek Krzystek, Martin Dressel, Lapo Bogani, Frank Neese, Panayotis Kyritsis. Direct Observation of Very Large Zero-Field Splitting in a Tetrahedral Ni(II)Se4 Coordination Complex. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 137, 12923-12928 (2015).

Yvonne Wiemann, Julian Simmendinger, Conrad Clauss, Lapo Bogani, Daniel Bothner, Dieter Koelle, Reinhold Kleiner, Martin Dressel, Marc Scheffler. Observing electron spin resonance between 0.1 and 67 GHz at temperatures between 50 mK and 300 K using broadband metallic coplanar waveguides. Applied Physics Letters, 106, 193505 (2015).

Paolo Arosio, Maurizio Corti, Manuel Mariani, Francesco Orsini, Lapo Bogani, Andrea Caneschi, Jorge Lago, Alessandro Lascialfari. Local spin dynamics at low temperature in the slowly relaxing molecular chain [Dy (hfac) 3 {NIT (C6H4OPh)}]: a μ+ spin relaxation study. Journal of Applied Physics, 117, 17B310 (2015).

Christian Cervetti, Eric Heintze, Boris Gorshunov, Elena Zhukova, Svyatoslav Lobanov, Alexander Hoyer, Marko Burghard, Klaus Kern, Martin Dressel, Lapo Bogani. Graphene: Sub‐Terahertz Frequency‐Domain Spectroscopy Reveals Single‐Grain Mobility and Scatter Influence of Large‐Area Graphene. Advanced Materials, 27, 2676-2676 (2015). -Journal cover page-

Kydala Ganesha Padmalekha, Marian Blankenhorn, Tomislav Ivek, Lapo Bogani, John A Schlueter, Martin Dressel. ESR studies on the spin-liquid candidate κ-(BEDT-TTF) 2 Cu 2 (CN) 3: Anomalous response below T=8K. Physica B: Condensed Matter, 460, 211-213 (2015).

Michael Slota, Marian Blankenhorn, Eric Heintze, Minh Vu, Ralph Hübner, Lapo Bogani. Photoswitchable stable charge-distributed states in a new cobalt complex exhibiting photo-induced valence tautomerism. Faraday discussions, 185, 347-359 (2015).

Ralph Konnerth, Christian Cervetti, Akimitsu Narita, Xinliang Feng, Klaus Müllen, Alexander Hoyer, Marko Burghard, Klaus Kern, Martin Dressel, Lapo Bogani. Tuning the deposition of molecular graphene nanoribbons by surface functionalization. Nanoscale, 7, 12807-12811 (2015). -Journal cover page-

Selected previous publications:

A. Baniodeh, Y. Liang, C. E. Anson, N. Magnani, A. K. Powell, A. Unterreiner, S. Seyfferle, M. Slota, M. Dressel, L. Bogani, K. Goß "Unraveling Electronic Processes in Magnetic Lanthanide-Based Toruses: Intra- and Inter-Molecular Mechanisms" Advanced Functional Materials, 24 6280-6290 (2014).

Eric Heintze, Fadi El Hallak, Conrad Clauß, Angelo Rettori, Maria Gloria Pini, Federico Totti, Martin Dressel, Lapo Bogani. Dynamic control of magnetic nanowires by light-induced domain-wall kickoffs. Nature Materials, 12, 202-206 (2013).

M.G. Pini, A. Rettori, L. Bogani, A. Lascialfari, M. Mariani, A. Caneschi, R. Sessoli, "Finite-size effects on the dynamic susceptibility of CoPhOMe single-chain molecular magnets in presence of a static magnetic field" Physical Review B 84, 094444 (2011).

L. Bogani, C. Danieli, E. Biavardi, E. Dalcanale, N. Bendiab, W. Wernsdorfer, A. Cornia "Single-Molecule-Magnet Carbon-Nanotube Hybrids" Angewandte Chemie International Edition 48, 746-750 (2009).

Lapo Bogani, Wolfgang Wernsdorfer. Molecular spintronics using single-molecule magnets. Nature Materials, 7, 179-186 (2008).

L. Bogani, L. Cavigli, M. Gurioli, R. Novak, M. Mannini, A. Caneschi, F. Pineider, R. Sessoli, M. Clemente-Léon, E. Coronado A. Cornia, D. Gatteschi "Magneto-optical investigations of nanostructured materials based on single-molecule magnets monitor strong environmental effects" Advanced Materials 19, 3906-3911 (2007).

K. Bernot, L. Bogani, A.Caneschi, R. Sessoli, D. Gatteschi "The first Rare-Earths Based Family of Single Chain Magnets: Playing with Anisotropy" Journal of the American Chemical Society 128, 7947 (2006).

P. L. Gentili, L. Bussotti, R. Righini, A. Beni, L. Bogani, A. Dei "Time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of photo-induced valence tautomerism for a cobalt-dioxolene complex" Chemical Physics 314, 9-17 (2005).

L. Bogani, C. Sangregorio, R. Sessoli, D. Gatteschi "Molecular Engeneering for Single Chain Magnet Behavior in a one-Dimensional Dysprosium-Nitronyl-Nitroxide Compound" Angewandte Chemie International Edition 44, 5817 (2005).

L. Bogani, A. Caneschi, M. Fedi, D. Gatteschi, M. Massi, M. A. Novak, M. G. Pini, A. Rettori, R. Sessoli, A. Vindigni "Finite-Size effects in Single Chain Magnets: an experimental and theoretical study" Physical Review Letters 92, 207204 (2004).

Projects Available

*Putting spins into carbon nanostructures
Dr L. Bogani and Professor G. A. D. Briggs

Conducting carbon nanostructures have already been integrated in functioning electronic nanodevices and could soon constitute the fundamental elements of a new era in electronics. Some of the most interesting representatives of this class of materials are probably graphene and carbon nanotubes. At the same time research in the field of spintronics has become a leading part of today’s science and technology. In this DPhil project you will connect the two fields of carbon nanostructures and spintronics, further developing the new field of molecular spintronics. The work will comprise the fabrication of carbon nanodevices with magnetic properties and their characterization of conducting nanostructures. The project is strongly multidisciplinary and candidates from materials, chemistry and physics will be welcome. The work is developed in the context of national and European collaborations, so different aspects can be emphasised depending on the interests and attitude of the candidate. Visits and learning periods to international laboratories can also be arranged if appropriate. The student will join an active and lively laboratory with an international atmosphere. He or she will be assisted in developing a personal vision and an autonomous scientific profile, as well as possible industrial links and scientific collaborations.

Candidates will be considered in the January 2017 admissions cycle which has an application deadline of 20 January 2017.

This 3.5-year EPSRC DTP studentship will provide full fees and maintenance for a student who has home fee status (this includes an EU student who has spent the previous three years (or more) in the UK undertaking undergraduate study). The stipend will be at least £15,296 per year. Other EU students should read the guidance at http://www.materials.ox.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate/eu.html for further information about eligibility.

Any questions concerning the project can be addressed to Dr Lapo Bogani (lapo.bogani@materials.ox.ac.uk) or Professor Andrew Briggs (andrew.briggs@materials.ox.ac.uk). General enquiries on how to apply can be made by e mail to graduate.studies@materials.ox.ac.uk. You must complete the standard Oxford University Application for Graduate Studies. Further information and an electronic copy of the application form can be found at http://www.ox.ac.uk/admissions/postgraduate_courses/apply/index.html.

 

Also see homepages: Lapo Bogani Andrew Briggs

Optical Quantum Control of Molecular States
L. Bogani

Several drawbacks have plagued the field of molecular electronics, up to now. For example the molecules cannot be placed into junctions in a controlled and reproducible way. Thus no control over the mutual direction of the electron flow and the magnetization is achieved. Reproducibility of the measurements is a long-lasting problem in single-molecule electronics, and doubts over what is really measured sometimes arise. Moreover we have no idea on what is the effect of the electron flow on the magnetic properties of a molecule, while one can easily imagine that the passage of electrons will strongly affect the magnetic properties. In this DPhil thesis the candidate will develop a new, original method of measuring interaction between one single spin and one flowing electron: Instead of using two bulk electrodes and place the molecule in between, we will grow two photoactive groups on the two sides of the molecule. When a light pulse is shone on the system electron flow from one group to the other occurs, and the effect can be detected via pulsed at GHz frequencies. This allows overcoming all the aforementioned problems, providing the candidate with an insuperably clean, time-resolved method to investigate electron-spin interactions. The thesis is strongly multidisciplinary and candidates from materials, chemistry and physics will be welcome. The work is developed in the context of national and European collaborations, so different aspects can be privileged depending on the interests and attitude of the candidate. Visits and learning periods to international laboratories can also be arranged. The candidate will join an active and lively laboratory with an international atmosphere. He will be assisted in developing a personal vision and an autonomous scientific profile, as well as possible industrial links and scientific collaborations. Please refer directly to Dr. Lapo Bogani for details.

Also see homepages: Lapo Bogani

Synthesis and characterization of novel magnetic materials
L. Bogani / J. Le Roy / Prof. H. Anderson

The field of molecular magnetism is a playground where the desired functionalities can be inserted into magnetic materials by rationally tuning the molecular systems, using chemical synthesis. In this project you will play with the chemical possibilities of coordination chemistry compounds, creating molecular and extended structures with novel spin properties, long coherence times and an admixture of electronic and magnetic properties. The materials will be tailored by changing the topology, by introducing novel functionalities (e.g. pi-stacking groups, luminescent elements, etc…) and will be the basis for an in-depth exploration with electron paramagnetic resonance, magnetometry, and conduction experiments. Special attention will be placed on the quantum properties of the magnetic nanomaterials, and their inclusion into functional nanodevices. The thesis is rather synthesis (+characterization) oriented and suitable candidates from materials or chemistry background. The work is developed in the context of national and European collaborations, so different aspects can be privileged depending on the interests and attitude of the candidate. Visits and learning periods to international laboratories can also be arranged. The candidate will join an active and lively laboratory with an international atmosphere. He will be assisted in developing a personal vision and an autonomous scientific profile, as well as possible industrial links and scientific collaborations. Please refer directly to Dr. Lapo Bogani for details.

Also see homepages: Lapo Bogani

Microwave to optical conversion using molecular magnetic emitters
Dr L. Bogani /Dr E. A. Laird / Professor J. M. Smith / Professor G. A. D. Briggs

Future quantum systems will likely use several elements conceived with different strategies. These elements, such as photonic networks or superconducting circuits, typically operate at extremely different frequencies, and making them communicate is fundamental for integrated quantum devices. Even techniques to coherently connect remotely-located superconducting nodes would necessitate optical signals and is yet to be developed. This project will develop a coherent microwave-to-optical interface within hybrid quantum architectures for large scale distributed quantum computing. The platform will allow interfacing devices consisting of superconducting microwave resonators by coupling them to emitting spin centres. The resulting scheme will thus allow converting quantum information between two completely different regimes, GHz and optical, that are of crucial relevance for networking. The work will comprise the fabrication of nanodevices with superconducting and magnetic properties and their characterization at low temperatures. The thesis is strongly multidisciplinary and candidates from materials, chemistry and physics will be welcome. The work is developed in the context of an international collaboration, so different aspects can be privileged depending on the interests and attitude of the candidate. The candidate will join an active and lively laboratory with an international atmosphere. He will be assisted in developing a personal vision and an autonomous scientific profile, as well as possible industrial links and scientific collaborations. Please refer directly to Dr. Lapo Bogani, Dr. Edward Laird, Prof. Jason Smith or Prof. Andrew Briggs for details.

Also see homepages: Lapo Bogani Andrew Briggs Edward Laird

Mimicking electronics with magnetic systems
L Bogani

In this DPhil project you will explore the possibilities opened by almost-perfectly one-dimensional systems, composed by metal chains ordered in a crystal. You will build on our previous expertise to create novel systems, where the usual properties of an electronic circuit (energy bands, capacitor etc…) are mimicked into a molecular spin system. This will produce the first spin analogues of nanoscale electronic devices, and will help establish the first tenets of a new area of research. The characterization will be developed using magnetometry and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy at low temperatures and in magnetic field. The thesis is strongly multidisciplinary and candidates from materials, chemistry and physics will be welcome. The work is developed in the context of national and European collaborations, so different aspects can be privileged depending on the interests and attitude of the candidate. Visits and learning periods to international laboratories can also be arranged. The candidate will join an active and lively laboratory with an international atmosphere. He will be assisted in developing a personal vision and an autonomous scientific profile, as well as possible industrial links and scientific collaborations. Please refer directly to Dr. Lapo Bogani for details.

Also see homepages: Lapo Bogani

Also see a full listing of New projects available within the Department of Materials.