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Harish Bhaskaran

Professor Harish Bhaskaran
Associate Professor of Materials

Advanced Nanoscale Engineering Group

Department of Materials
University of Oxford
16 Parks Road
Oxford OX1 3PH
UK

Tel: +44 1865 273772 (direct)
Tel: +44 1865 273772 (Room 276.40.21)
Tel: +44 1865 273700 (switchboard)
Fax: +44 1865 273789 (general fax)


Bhaskaran Lab

Summary of Interests

The manufacturing and applications of nanoscale devices, particularly in the development of energy efficient nanoscale manufacturing, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) and novel non-von-Neumann computing using phase change materials.

Research Publications

  • D.S. Engstrom, B. Porter, M. Pacios and H. Bhaskaran, “Additive nanomanufacturing – A review,” Journal of Materials Research, available on CJOAugust 2014. doi:10.1557/jmr.2014.159 (2014).
  • P. Hosseini, CD Wright and H. Bhaskaran, “An optoelectronic framework enabled by low-dimensional phase change films,” Nature 511, 206–211 (2014).
  • C. Rios, P. Hosseini, CD. Wright, H. Bhaskaran and WHP. Pernice, “On-chip Photonic Memory Elements employing Phase-Change Materials,” Advanced Materials, doi: 10.1002/adma.201304476 (2014).
  • BF. Porter, L. Abelmann and H. Bhaskaran, “Design parameters for voltage controllable directed assembly of single nanoparticles,” Nanotechnology 24 405304, 2013.
  • C. Rios, P. Hosseini, CD. Wright, H. Bhaskaran and WHP. Pernice, Tunable Nanophotonic circuits based on phase change materials,” Proceedings of European Phase Change and Ovonics Symposium, 2013. (Invited)
  • CD. Wright, Y-Y. Au, MM. Aziz, H. Bhaskaran, R. Cobley, G. Rodriguez-Hernandez, P. Hosseini, WHP. Pernice and L. Wang, “Novel applications possibilities for phase change materials and devices,” Proceedings of European Phase Change and Ovonics Symposium, 2013. (Invited)
  • G. Rodriguez-Hernandez, P. Hosseini, Yat-Yin Au, WHP Pernice, CD Wright and H. Bhaskaran, “Mixed-Mode Electro Optical Properties of Ge2Sb2Te5,” International Symposium on Optical Memory ISOM2013, Incheon, Korea (Invited).
  • D. Garcia-Sanchez, KY Fong, H. Bhaskaran, S. Lamoreaux and HX Tang, “Casimir microscope based upon metallized high Q SiN nanomembrane resonator,” Review of Scientific Instruments 84, 015115 (2013).
  • WHP. Pernice and H. Bhaskaran, “Photonic non-volatile memories using phase change materials,” Applied Physics Letters 101, 011243 2012 Cover Page Article. Also highlighted in Nature Photonics "Non-volatile storage" January 2013
  • D. Garcia-Sanchez, K. Fong, H.Bhaskaran, S. Lamoreaux and HX Tang, “Casimir Force and surface potential measurements between a nanomembrane resonator and a millimeter sphere,” Physical Review Letters 109, 027202 2012. Editor’s Suggestion, See Also: “Drumming to the beat of vacuum” – APS Physics Spotlight Synopsis.
  • A. Sebastian, N. Shamsudhin, H. Rothuizen, U. Drechsler, W. Koelmans, H. Bhaskaran, JJ. Quenzer, B. Wagner and M. Despont, “Design and Fabrication of micro-cantilevers for multi-frequency atomic force microscopy,” IBM Research Report RZ3832, Z1209-001 (2012).
  • A. Sebastian, N. Shamsudhin, H. Rothuizen, U. Drechsler, W. Koelmans, H. Bhaskaran, JJ. Quenzer, B. Wagner and M. Despont, “Micro-cantilevers with integrated actuation and conductive tips for multi-frequency atomic force microscopy,” Review of Scientific Instruments 83, 096107, 2012.
  • WHP. Pernice and H. Bhaskaran, “Photonic-based non-volatile memory device using phase change materials,” Nature Conference on Frontiers in Electronic Materials: Correlation Effects and Memristive Phenomena, Jun 17-20, 2012, Aachen.
  • H. Bhaskaran, M. Li, D. Garcia-Sanchez, P. Zhao, I.Takeuchi and H.X. Tang, “Active microcantilevers based on piezoresistive ferromagnetic thin films,” Applied Physics Letters 98, 013502 2011.
  • H. Bhaskaran, B. Gotsmann, A. Sebastian, U. Drechsler, MA.Lantz, M. Despont, P. Jaroenapibal, RW. Carpick, Y. Liu and K. Sridharan, “Ultralow nanoscale wear through atom-by-atom attrition in silicon-containing diamond-like carbon,” Nature Nanotechnology, 5, 181 - 185 2010.         See Also: “Diamond-like tip better than the best” EU Cordis News“Achieving ultralow nanoscale wear of one atom per micrometer” Nanowerk“Nano-foundry technique yields ultra-durable probes from diamond” PhysOrg.

 

 

 

 

 

Projects Available

Advanced Nanoscale Engineering Group - Several Exciting New Applied DPhil Research Areas
H. Bhaskaran

We are now seeking DPhil students in all areas of interest to the . Please browse through the group's research and publications and contact Prof Bhaskaran for details. Examples of projects available include exciting display applications of phase change materials (see recent news articles linked to on our webpage), artificial retinas and muscles, highly novel and sensitive NEMS, nanomanufacturing as well as nanoscale device manufacture and testing. Although several individial projects are listed below, the creative student will have the option of tailoring a research in collaboration with the supervisor.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Nanomechanical Systems (NEMS) based on Carbon
H. Bhaskaran

Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are systems where a tiny mechanical element is fabricated to add certain functionality to a device or a system. These systems are functional not only because they occupy less space, but more so because they can perform functions that larger devices cannot or carry out certain tasks with greater precision and efficiency. Our group is seeking DPhil students to carry on this work starting from October 2014. The focus will be on using non-traditional materials, especially amorphous carbon, in NEMS devices. We will also seek to study fundamental aspects of materials science, which will help us create even better devices in future.

An incoming DPhil student will have significant advantages: our experimental capability in this area is now set-up, and we have some of the most advanced instrumentation in the field. Our group has several individuals who can informally work with the student, so the student will not feel lost in their first few months.

Your Profile:
Your profile will be one of a highly motivated undergraduate (evidenced by previous stints in Research laboratories), first class honors degree (or equivalent) earning undergraduate in Physics, Materials, Engineering or a closely related field with a deep desire to carry out independent experimental research. You must like working on hands-on laboratory experiments and have the desire to try out many novel ideas. Evidence (via references) of initiative and ability to work collaboratively would be a plus, as this is an experimental project.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Nanoparticle toxicity characterization via atomic force microscopy
H. Bhaskaran

Nanoparticle toxicity is of high interest because of emerging concerns regarding their environmental impact. However, recent methods to manufacture nanoparticles using bio-inspired processing have been reasonably successful. The big question is: what is the difference between such bio-inspired processing routes and conventional routes. The DPhil student who will work on this project will pursue very advanced atomic force microscopy techniques in our laboratory to understand how surface texture at the nanoscale, as well charge contribute to theor toxicity. 

Our group is very well set-up to perform these measurements. We are now in possession of one of the most advanced atomic force microscopes with excellent collaborations with Asylum Research in Santa Barbara. Thus a DPhil student will be able to start on this project with plenty of informal as well as formal mentoring and support.

Your Profile:
Your profile will be one of a highly motivated undergraduate (evidenced by previous stints in Research laboratories), first class honors degree (or equivalent) earning undergraduate in Physics, Materials, Engineering or a closely related field with a deep desire to carry out independent experimental research. You must like working on hands-on laboratory experiments and have the desire to try out many novel ideas. Evidence (via references) of initiative and ability to work collaboratively would be a plus, as this is an experimental project.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Nanorobots for pick and place assembly of nano particles
H. Bhaskaran

We have an ambitious plan to deliver pick-and-place manufacturing at the nanoscale. To realize our ambitions, we are looking for a team member to pursue the doctorate on fundamental aspects of nanoscience, including the study of surface forces at the nanoscale and the ability to attract single nanoparticles reliably, and place them in a manner similar to automobile assembly - except this is at the nanoscale. This project is in close collaboration with Asylum Research of Santa Barbara USA, IBM Research - Zurich, Switzerland and the Microelectronics iNets with potential opportunities to travel to partner sites. 

The DPhil student working on this project will become an expert in advanced nanomanufacturing techniques, atomic force microscopy and nanoparticle assembly. All our projects allow for significant creative contributions and the right DPhil candidate will have the freedom to shape research directions.

Your Profile:
Your profile will be one of a highly motivated undergraduate (evidenced by previous stints in Research laboratories), first class honors degree (or equivalent) earning undergraduate in Physics, Materials, Engineering or a closely related field with a deep desire to carry out independent experimental research. You must like working on hands-on laboratory experiments and have the desire to try out many novel ideas. Evidence (via references) of initiative and ability to work collaboratively would be a plus, as this is an experimental project involving many collaborations.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Advanced Nanoscale Engineering Group - Several Exciting New Applied DPhil Research Areas
Harish Bhaskaran

We are now seeking DPhil students in all areas of interest to the . Please browse through the group's research and publications and contact Prof Bhaskaran for details. Examples of projects available include exciting display applications of phase change materials (see recent news articles linked to on our webpage), artificial retinas and muscles, highly novel and sensitive NEMS, nanomanufacturing as well as nanoscale device manufacture and testing. Although several individial projects are listed below, the creative student will have the option of tailoring a research in collaboration with the supervisor.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Unconventional Computing using a Materials Science Approach
H. Bhaskaran

We want to achieve something unique - creating a computing system where data storage and processing are closely linked using a materials science approach. In this exciting and pioneering project we aim to create nanoscale devices using phase change materials, and investigate arithmetic computations on these devices - this is our attempt to mimic biological computing processes (albeit at a very early stage).

This is difficult to achieve, and so we need very, very bright and motivated colleagues. Doctoral students working on this project will have much scope to effect a large-scale impact in the future of computing. We also have several international academic collaborations for this project, and the student will have potential opportunities to travel to partner institutions in Germany and the USA.

The DPhil student working on this project will become an expert in phase change materials and memories as well as advanced measurement techniques. All our projects allow for significant creative contributions and the right DPhil candidate will have the freedom to shape research directions.

Your Profile:
Your profile will be one of a highly motivated undergraduate (evidenced by previous stints in Research laboratories), first class honors degree (or equivalent) earning undergraduate in Physics, Materials, Engineering or a closely related field with a deep desire to carry out independent experimental research. You must like working on hands-on laboratory experiments and have the desire to try out many novel ideas. Evidence (via references) of initiative and ability to work collaboratively would be a plus, as this is an experimental project.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Advanced Nanoscale Engineering Group - Several Exciting New Applied DPhil Research Areas
Harish Bhaskaran

We are now seeking DPhil students in all areas of interest to the . Please browse through the group's research and publications and contact Prof Bhaskaran for details. Examples of projects available include exciting display applications of phase change materials (see recent news articles linked to on our webpage), artificial retinas and muscles, highly novel and sensitive NEMS, nanomanufacturing as well as nanoscale device manufacture and testing. Although several individial projects are listed below, the creative student will have the option of tailoring a research in collaboration with the supervisor.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Graphene based sensors and actuators
H. Bhaskaran

Graphene has been around for a bit now, and technology is reasonably advanced in order for reasonable quality graphene to be procured commercially. However, the ability to make devices and test them is sorely lacking. Even worse is the inability to integrate graphene with other functional materials to make real nanoscale devices that actually perform important tasks. In this project, we will specifically target projects related to directly patterning graphene to make nanomechanical resonators. Our group has been gaining much expertise in reaching very high mass sensitivities using such sensors (mass less than a He atom), and we are seeking a DPhil student that can actually integrate sensing functions into arrays of such sensors.

Your Profile and application
Your profile will ideally be one of a highly motivated researcher (evidenced by previous stints in research groups or labs), having (or predicted to earn) a first class honors degree (or equivalent) undergraduate/masters in Physics, Materials, Engineering, Chemistry or a closely related field with a deep desire to carry out independent experimental research.  You must enjoy hands-on laboratory experiments and have the desire to try out many novel ideas.  Evidence (via references) of initiative would be a plus, as this is an experimental project.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Advanced Nanoscale Engineering Group - Several Exciting New Applied DPhil Research Areas
Harish Bhaskaran

We are now seeking DPhil students in all areas of interest to the . Please browse through the group's research and publications and contact Prof Bhaskaran for details. Examples of projects available include exciting display applications of phase change materials (see recent news articles linked to on our webpage), artificial retinas and muscles, highly novel and sensitive NEMS, nanomanufacturing as well as nanoscale device manufacture and testing. Although several individial projects are listed below, the creative student will have the option of tailoring a research in collaboration with the supervisor.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Also see a full listing of New projects available within the Department of Materials.