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Harish Bhaskaran

Professor Harish Bhaskaran
Professor of Applied Nanomaterials
EPSRC Fellow in Manufacturing
Advanced Nanoscale Engineering Group

Department of Materials
16 Parks Road
Oxford OX1 3PH

Tel: +44 1865 273772 (Room 276.40.21)
Tel: +44 1865 273777 (reception)
Fax: +44 1865 273789 (general fax)

Click for Bhaskaran Lab homepage

Summary of Interests

Novel brain-inspired and neuromorphic photonic computing using phase change materials. Advanced nanomanufacturing of devices.

Research Publications

J. Feldmann, M. Stegmaier, N. Gruhler, C. Rios, H. Bhaskaran, CD. Wright and WHP. Pernice, “Calculating with light using a chip-scale all-optical abacus,” Nature Communications, 1256, doi: 10.1038/s41467-017-01506-3 (2017).
Z. Cheng, C. Rios, WHP Pernice, CD Wright and H Bhaskaran, “On-chip photonic synapse,” Science Advances Vol. 3, no. 9, e1700160 (2017).
M. Wuttig, H. Bhaskaran and T. Taubner, “Phase Change Materials for non-volatile photonic applications,” Nature Photonics, 11, 465–476 (2017).
BF. Porter, N. Mkhize and H. Bhaskaran, “Nanoparticle assembly enabled by printed monolayers,” Microsystems and Nanoengineering, 3, 17054, doi: :10.1038/micronano.2017.54 (2017).
GS Sarwat, P Gehring, G Rodriguez-Hernandez, GAD Briggs, JA Mol and H Bhaskaran, “Scaling limits of graphene nanoelectrodes,” Nano Letters, doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b00909 (2017).
C. Rios, M. Stegmeier, P. Hosseini, D. Wang, T. Scherer, CD Wright, H. Bhaskaran and WHP Pernice, “Integrated all-photonic non-volatile multi-level memory”, Nature Photonics, doi:10.1038/nphoton.2015.182 (2015).
P. Hosseini, CD. Wright and H. Bhaskaran, “An optoelectronic framework enabled by low-dimensional phase change materials,” Nature 511, 206-211 (2014).
H. Bhaskaran, B. Gotsmann, A. Sebastian, U. Drechsler, MA.Lantz, M. Despont, P. Jaroenapibal, RW. Carpick, Y. Liu and K. Sridharan, “Ultralow nanoscale wear through atom-by-atom attrition in silicon-containing diamond-like carbon,” Nature Nanotechnology, 5, 181 - 185 (2010). 

Projects Available

Nanorobots for pick and place assembly of nano particles
H. Bhaskaran

We have an ambitious plan to deliver pick-and-place manufacturing at the nanoscale. To realize our ambitions, we are looking for a team member to pursue the doctorate on fundamental aspects of nanoscience, including the study of surface forces at the nanoscale and the ability to attract single nanoparticles reliably, and place them in a manner similar to automobile assembly - except this is at the nanoscale. This project is in close collaboration with Asylum Research of Santa Barbara USA, IBM Research - Zurich, Switzerland and the Microelectronics iNets with potential opportunities to travel to partner sites. 

The DPhil student working on this project will become an expert in advanced nanomanufacturing techniques, atomic force microscopy and nanoparticle assembly. All our projects allow for significant creative contributions and the right DPhil candidate will have the freedom to shape research directions.

Your Profile:
Your profile will be one of a highly motivated undergraduate (evidenced by previous stints in Research laboratories), first class honors degree (or equivalent) earning undergraduate in Physics, Materials, Engineering or a closely related field with a deep desire to carry out independent experimental research. You must like working on hands-on laboratory experiments and have the desire to try out many novel ideas. Evidence (via references) of initiative and ability to work collaboratively would be a plus, as this is an experimental project involving many collaborations.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Advanced nano materials characterization via atomic force microscopy
H. Bhaskaran

Nanoparticle toxicity is of high interest because of emerging concerns regarding their environmental impact. However, recent methods to manufacture nanoparticles using bio-inspired processing have been reasonably successful. The big question is: what is the difference between such bio-inspired processing routes and conventional routes. The DPhil student who will work on this project will pursue very advanced atomic force microscopy techniques in our laboratory to understand how surface texture at the nanoscale, as well charge contribute to theor toxicity. 

Our group is very well set-up to perform these measurements. We are now in possession of one of the most advanced atomic force microscopes with excellent collaborations with Asylum Research in Santa Barbara. Thus a DPhil student will be able to start on this project with plenty of informal as well as formal mentoring and support.

Your Profile:
Your profile will be one of a highly motivated undergraduate (evidenced by previous stints in Research laboratories), first class honors degree (or equivalent) earning undergraduate in Physics, Materials, Engineering or a closely related field with a deep desire to carry out independent experimental research. You must like working on hands-on laboratory experiments and have the desire to try out many novel ideas. Evidence (via references) of initiative and ability to work collaboratively would be a plus, as this is an experimental project.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Nanomechanical Systems (NEMS) based on 2D materials
H. Bhaskaran

Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) are systems where a tiny mechanical element is fabricated to add certain functionality to a device or a system. These systems are functional not only because they occupy less space, but more so because they can perform functions that larger devices cannot or carry out certain tasks with greater precision and efficiency. Our group is seeking DPhil students to carry on this work starting from October 2014. The focus will be on using non-traditional materials, especially 2D materials, in NEMS devices. We will also seek to study fundamental aspects of materials science, which will help us create even better devices in future.

An incoming DPhil student will have significant advantages: our experimental capability in this area is now set-up, and we have some of the most advanced instrumentation in the field. Our group has several individuals who can informally work with the student, so the student will not feel lost in their first few months.

Your Profile:
Your profile will be one of a highly motivated undergraduate (evidenced by previous stints in Research laboratories), first class honors degree (or equivalent) earning undergraduate in Physics, Materials, Engineering or a closely related field with a deep desire to carry out independent experimental research. You must like working on hands-on laboratory experiments and have the desire to try out many novel ideas. Evidence (via references) of initiative and ability to work collaboratively would be a plus, as this is an experimental project.

Also see homepages: Harish Bhaskaran

Also see a full listing of New projects available within the Department of Materials.